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Press Photos for the Media of the National Museum of Finland

National Museum of Finland logos

Press Photos for the Media of the Workshop Vintti



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Come to Finland exhibition is a journey to the history of the brand of Finland


Come to Finland – Paradise Calling exhibition, opening at the National Museum of Finland on 17 February, shows how Finland was marketed abroad before and after the country was declared independent. Travel posters and slogans painted a picture of a paradise where one could experience the fascination of untouched nature while also getting to know the progressive, international, and open Finnish society.

Posters were the means for getting the message around the world, much like the Internet is today. Adventurous European and American tourists were invited to try something different and incredible in the Northern country through beautiful pictures and tempting slogans.

In addition to famous artists, Come to Finland exhibition presents works by lesser known poster artists and their contribution in really putting Finland on the map. Travel-related artefacts and souvenirs from the collections of the National Museum have been showcased alongside the posters. Perhaps they can remind us ever so slightly about an event or place we once heard of or visited?

Approximately 100 vintage posters are presented, all of which are authentic first editions. In addition, posters created by modern day graphic and other artists for the purposes of the exhibition are also presented; images of how they see and feel the Finland of today. An open poster competition is also related to the exhibition: the best works are showcased.

Come to Finland exhibition opens the Finland 100 jubilee year for the National Museum. Throughout the year, exhibitions will be centred around the theme of Finnishness and Finnish history from new and sometimes surprising perspectives.

The press conference for the exhibition will be organised on 16 February 2017 at 9 am at the National Museum's Studio.

For more information, please contact:
Director of Marketing Jonna Heliskoski, jonna.heliskoski@kansallismuseo.fi, tel. +358 (0)295 33 6342

Curator Aino-Maija Kaila, aino-maija.kaila@kansallismuseo.fi, tel. +358 (0)295 33 6362
Poster hunter Magnus Londen, Come to Finland Publishing, magnus.londen@cometofinland.fi, tel. 044 378 8448


Come to Finland
Paradise Calling
Opening hours 17 Feb – 28 May 2017 Tue–Sun 11 am–6 pm.
Tickets EUR 10/7, free entry for those under 18.
kansallismuseo.fi

Image bank >> (please request for high resolution images: juuli.bister@kansallismuseo.fi, sari.hakkinen@museovirasto.fi)

Image bank >> (please request for high resolution images: juuli.bister@kansallismuseo.fi, sari.hakkinen@museovirasto.fi)

-® Jorma Suhonen & Come to Finland Publishing
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For the media on 21st September  2016


The Renaissance. Now! exhibition brings rare Renaissance art from Italy to Finland


The Renaissance. Now! - from Raphael to Titian exhibition brings 42 works by Italian masters to the National Museum of Finland. This will be the first time these 16th and 17th century works are on display in Finland. The exhibition also presents other artefacts from the era.


The exhibition presents works by more than 20 artists. This is a rare occasion to see works by master painters like Raphael and Titian in Finland. Raphael and Titian are among the famous names in Renaissance painting, along with figures such as Leonardo Da Vinci and Michelangelo. In addition to Raphael and Titian, the exhibition showcases works by other noted artists – Lorenzo Lotto, Tintoretto, Girolamo Romanino and Giovanni Battista Moroni, to name but a few. Works by two famous female artists are also on display.

This is the National Museum of Finland's Centenary Year Exhibition. The museum borrowed most of the works from the Pinacoteca Tosio Martinego museum in Brescia, and from other Italian art lenders. The paintings exhibited represent the Lombardy style of Renaissance visual art. The exhibition comes to the National Museum of Finland from Poland, where it was on display earlier this year. After Helsinki, the exhibition will be put on show in the Netherlands.

“We are very excited to present for the first time in Finland masterpieces from Raphael and other great Italian Renaissance painters. This exhibition was organized in cooperation with two museums and production company StArt and it beautifully celebrates the centenary of the National Museum of Finland”,
says General Director Luigi Di Corato from Fondazione Brescia Musei.

In addition to the paintings, the exhibition presents Renaissance artefacts. The exhibition features ten Italian medals from the collections of the National Museum of Finland, a 15th century dowry chest that is a loan from Lahti, and typical armour from Italy.

The Renaissance was a period between the Middle Ages and the Early Modern Age, from the 14th to the late 16th century. The period changed people’s thinking, culture, science and art. In visual arts, the Renaissance manifested itself as more realistic representations of the human body and space and new motifs. In the Middle Ages, art was predominantly religious, but the Renaissance allowed artists to explore other themes, such as scenes from antiquity, landscapes and portraits. Antiquity was an important source of inspiration.

“What fascinates me about the Renaissance is how people turned their eyes to history. The new culture was inspired by things that happened a thousand years ago. It is an excellent example of how the past serves as a foundation of the present”, says Head of Exhibitions Minerva Keltanen.

The ideal of realistic depictions in visual arts dates back to the antiquity. No actual artworks survived from the period, but Renaissance painters read about their ancient forerunners in written sources. In the Middle Ages, spiritual life assumed the leading role in visual arts. In the Renaissance, the attention shifted back to realism, and artists worshipped physical beauty.

The Renaissance in a nutshell
  • The Renaissance was a period between the Middle Ages and the Early Modern Age, from the 14th to the late 16th century. The term ‘renaissance’ literally means rebirth.
  • The era transformed culture, science, art and the way people thought – the fragmentation of religious power and new scientific methods marked the birth of modern humanity as we understand it today.
  • In visual arts, the Renaissance manifested itself as more realistic representations of the human body and space and new motifs. In the Middle Ages, art was predominantly religious, but the Renaissance allowed artists to explore other themes, such as scenes from antiquity, landscapes and portraits.
  •  Paintings were created to order for the church, the nobility and the new, wealthy bourgeoisie.
  • The Renaissance was the first period when artists started to sign their works.
  • The Renaissance spread to Northern Europe slowly, as graphics gradually spread across Europe. Artists used the graphics, for example, to reproduce works by the Italian masters.

Exhibition

  • Most of the paintings are from Pinacoteca Museo Tosio Martinengo in Brescia. The museum is part of the Fondazione Brescia Musei foundation.
  •  Produced by StArt
  • Italian curators Roberta D’Adda and Luigi Di Corato
  • Finnish curator Minerva Keltanen
  • Graphic design: G-Works
  • The Italian Cultural Institute supported the exhibition in Finland.
  • The Embassy of Italy is the patron of the exhibition.
Siunaava Kristus Vapahtaja_renessanssi
Raphael: The Blessing Christ
Raffaello Sanzio da Urbino, or Raphael, was a distinguished and well-known artist in his time. He is said to have had around 50 assistants to help him though the different stages of artistic creation.  The exhibition will feature, among other works, Christ Blessing by Raphael. This painting was most likely created for a private client as a devotional image.
 
Isotta Brembati Giovan Battista Moroni 839) jpg
Giovan Battista Moroni: Isotta Brembati
Isotta Brembati by Moroni is an exceptional piece, because it is a full length portrait of a woman. Usually, full length portraits were reserved for the ruling class.

 Lateraanikirkon kaniikin muotokuva Sofonisba
Sofonisba Anguissola: Portrait of a Canon of the Lateran
Female artists were rare during the Renaissance. One of the most talented female artists of the era was Sofonisba Anguissola, a daughter of a noble family. Four of the five daughters in the Anguissola family were painters. Sofonisba Anguissola was famous even during her lifetime, in particular for her portraits. She enjoyed a long career as an artist and died at the age of 93.

Exhibition:

The Renaissance. Now! – from Raphael to Titian – Paintings from 16th century Italy
At the National Museum of Finland from 23 September 2016 to 15 January 2017
Admission fees:  Adults €15/€14 for S bonus card holders/Discount ticket €11/For Museum and Helsinki card holders €5

More information and images:

Minerva Keltanen, Head of Exhibitions, tel. +358 (0)295 33 6463, minerva.keltanen@kansallismuseo.fi
Aino-Maija Kaila, Curator, tel. +358 (0)295 33 6362, aino-maija.kaila@kansallismuseo.fi
Image bank




renessanssi_pinkki mies




For the media on 27 April  2016

The photography exhibition Rooms Hidden by the Water opens the doors of the palaces of Venetian nobility


On Friday 29 April, the first extensive exhibition of modern photography in the National Museum of Finland opens to the public. On display are approximately 50 photographs by the photographer Jaakko Heikkilä, taken from 2005 to 2016 in the noble palaces of Venice. The photographs of palaces are complemented by Venetian furniture from the late 1800s from the collections of the National Museum of Finland. The exhibition runs until 28 August 2016.


The photographs of Jaakko Heikkilä offer a unique opportunity to take a peek into the closed palaces of the diminishing numbers of Venetian nobility and encounter their residents. Venetian nobility live a life bound and perhaps even protected by their history. In the photographs, you can sense the glamorous past of the nobility and the presence of history in the current day.

Heikkilä started to take photographs of Venetian nobility with the help of Agnes Kohlmeyer, curator and professor of modern art at the IUAV University Venice, who opened the doors of the first palace for him in 2009 and many others after that.

There is something lonely and melancholy in the grand palaces. At the same time, they fascinate you with their visual aspect and their residents add a human dimension. I am interested in old riches of the nobility, and the families’ past that reaches far back to a time when Venice still was an independent republic,’ says photographer Jaakko Heikkilä.

On display in the exhibition are portraits of the noble families, images of the palace interiors, and shots of the cityscape and its canals. Water plays an important role in the photographs.

Water defines Venice. The city encourages you to see and watch the water. The reflections on the surface of the water are in perpetual motion, and the whole city and its palaces are reflected in the water,’ Heikkilä says.

Rooms Hidden by the Water is the first extensive exhibition of modern photography in the National Museum of Finland. It is a part of a renovation in which the museum is expanding and diversifying its exhibition offering.

The museum offers a stunning venue for the photographs. It is an honour to be the first modern photographer to have their exhibition on display at the National Museum of Finland,’ Heikkilä says.

In addition to the photographs, Venetian glass from the 1800s and furniture from the National Museum’s own collection are also on display in the exhibition. The objects have been donated to the museum by private collectors over time.
   
Jaakko Heikkilä (b. 1956 in Kemi) has worked as an independent photographer since 1990. He is an observer of people, and he has gained recognition as a photographer of individuals and groups of people around the world. He has had private and group exhibitions in the USA, South America and most European countries. Heikkilä received the Finnish State Prize for Photographic Art in 2007, and he won the international art competition ‘Time and Nature’ in Hanau, Germany, in 2002. He was awarded the Lapland Art Prize in 1993.
The illustrated work ‘Rooms Hidden by the Water’, published by Heikkilä in April 2016, tells the story of the diminishing ranks of Venetian nobility’s present and past. The book is published by Maahenki in cooperation with the National Museum of Finland.
 
For more information, please contact:
Head of Exhibitions Minerva Keltanen, tel. +358 (0)295 33 6463, minerva.keltanen@kansallismuseo.fi
Curator Aino-Maija Kaila, tel. +358 (0)295 33 6362, aino-maija.kaila@kansallismuseo.fi
Press images: http://www.kansallismuseo.fi/fi/veden-katkeia-huoneita-nayttelyn-kuvat

Partner of the Rooms Hidden by the Water exhibition: The Italian Cultural Institute


Bobo

110x165



20.4.2016

Heavy Metal at Häme Castle brings a unique collection of armour to Finland


The Heavy Metal exhibition, which opens to the public on Friday 22 April, offers a unique opportunity to see arms and armour from Central Europe from the 1500s to the 1700s. Many of the suits of armour bear the marks of battle, but they are also decorative masterpieces of craftsmanship in metal. The exhibition, on display for the first time in Northern Europe, also tells a story of the history of European warfare, craftsmanship, fashion and culture. The exhibition is open until 23 October.

The objects in the exhibition come from the Universalmuseum Joanneum in Austria, which has the largest and oldest collection of armour in the world. On display in the exhibition are five complete plate armours of the Italian and the Maximilian types, as well as 12 half armours that were a part of the equipment of cavalry and foot soldiers. Also on display are helmets, halberds, spears, and swords, as well as muskets and wheel-lock pistols, not to mention a rare set of completely preserved horse armour.

The exhibition tells of an intriguing and critical point in military history. In the 1500s, the development of armour reached its peak, but its importance began to decrease during the following century as firearms developed and the tactics of warfare changed.

The objects are also a part of a larger story about European history. One of the most important objects in the exhibition is the suit of armour belonging to Charles II, Archduke of Inner Austria. Charles, who was a part of the Habsburg dynasty, was the son of Emperor Ferdinand I and a member of the elite society of his time. The suit of armour belonging to Charles which is on display was also depicted on his tomb as a reminder of the battle against the Ottoman Turks in 1566, where, in addition to Charles, only a handful of the Hungarian and Hapsburg troops survived. Despite their losses, Charles and his troops were able to prevent the Ottomans from reaching the gates of Vienna.

Several events related to the theme are to be held in connection with the Heavy Metal exhibition. During the opening weekend from 23 to 24 April, knights will be doing battle in a horse tournament by the Rohan Stables; at their fastest, the speed of a horse and rider can reach 80 kilometres per hour. On Whitsun Eve on 14 May, the romance of chivalry will fill the castle during the ‘Peitsi tanassa’ (Lances Up) event, to which both couples and single people looking for a partner are invited. Music lovers will be able to enjoy clavichord music by Baroque masters at the ‘Haarniskat sävelten lumoissa’ (Armours Enchanted by Music) concert on 29 May.

On the Musketeer Day on 11 June, visitors will be able to see wheel-lock pistols and muskets that are also on display in the exhibition in action, and the Vanaja Tournament, a gathering of enthusiasts of the mediaeval martial art of buhurt, will be held at the Castle on 3 September. The combat with edged weapons and armour resembles modern mixed martial arts: the team that manages to down their opponents is the victor.

At the same time as the Heavy Metal exhibition, knight stations with activities will be opened at the castle: there you will be able to try on armour, shoot a crossbow in a simulator and put together Leonardo’s bridge.

Press photos of the exhibition Heavy Metal: http://www.kansallismuseo.fi/fi/kansallismuseo/tiedotusvalineille/heavy-metal-lehdistokuvat

For more information, please contact:
Intendant Jouni Marjamäki, tel. +358 (0)295 33 6344, jouni.marjamaki@kansallismuseo.fi
Event Producer Jyrki Nissi, tel. +358 (0)295 33 6350, jyrki.nissi@kansallismuseo.fi
Curator Lea Värtinen, tel. +358 (0)295 33 6341, lea.vartinen@kansallismuseo.fi

Partners of the Heavy Metal exhibition: Universalmuseum Joanneum, Landeszeughaus, the Embassy of Austria, the City of Hämeenlinna, Lippupiste, Delfortgroup/Tervakoski Oy, UK Art Oy Ltd., PONTE – Organisation für kulturelles Management GmbH

Häme Castle
Kustaa III:n katu 6, Hämeenlinna
tel. +358 (0)295 33 6932, hameenlinna@kansallismuseo.fi
www.kansallismuseo.fi

Häme Castle is open
2 January – 30 April: Tue–Fri 10am–4pm, Sat–Sun 11am–4pm
2–31 May: Mon–Fri 10am–4pm, Sat–Sun 11am–4pm
1 June – 14 August: every day 11am–5pm
15 August – 18 December: Tue–Fri 10am–4pm, Sat–Sun 11am–4pm

Admission fees for the Heavy Metal exhibition: €15/11/8

Miehistöhaarniskoita joukkoasetelma
Infantry in defense position. Photo: Universalmuseum Joanneum, Graz,  Austria.



TurnajaishaarniskaGarniture for tournament. Photo: Universalmuseum Joannum, Graz, Austria.



For the media 14 December 2015

Refugee, evacuee, human

– a pop-up photography exhibition
at the National Museum

15 December 2015 – 6 March 2016


The Picture Collections of the National Board of Antiquities present a pop-up photography exhibition with photos of refugees, evacuees, immigrants and migrants: people who have arrived in or left Finland over the course of several decades.
Most of the photos are from between the 1920s and 1990s. The oldest photographs date back to 1893 and the most recent are from 2015.


The photographs are from the Picture Collections of the National Board of Antiquities and the Finnish Press Photo Archives JOKA. The most recent photographs have been taken by photographer Kaisa Rautaheimo of Helsingin Sanomat newspaper.

The oldest photographs from 1893 show Finnish immigrants leaving for the United Kingdom, Canada and the United States aboard the S/S Urania. The first quota refugees came to Finland from Chile and Vietnam in the 1970s.

Kaisa Rautaheimo has photographed the present refugee crisis for Helsingin Sanomat. The photos tell a story of the tens of thousands of asylum seekers who are now looking for security and a new life in Finland.

The exhibition will be open on the ground floor of the National Museum from 15 December 2015 to 6 March 2016. Admission to the photography exhibition is free of charge.

Media images


Preliminary information on the exhibition:

- Curator Aino-Maija Kaila, tel. +358 295 33 6362,
aino-maija.kaila@kansallismuseo.fi
- Curator Raija Linna, National Board of Antiquities Picture Collections, tel. +358 295 33 6124, raija.linna@museovirasto.fi
- Chief Intendant Ismo Malinen, The Picture Collections of the National Board of Antiquities, tel. +358 295 33 6382, ismo.malinen@museovirasto.fi

The National Museum of Finland, Mannerheimintie 34, Helsinki.
Open Tue–Sun 11 am–6 pm. Closed on 24–25 December 2015 and 1 January 2016.
Ticket office tel. +358 295 33 6901, Tue–Sun 11 am–6 pm.
www.kansallismuseo.fi
facebook.com/Kansallismuseo

The National Museum of Finland is the historic central museum of Finland with the core mission of archiving and sharing the nationally key capital of cultural history.
The museum family includes seven museums and two castles: National Museum of Finland, Museum of Cultures (whose operations continue at the National Museum), Maritime Museum of Finland, Seurasaari Open-Air Museum, Tamminiemi, Hvitträsk, Louhisaari Manor as well as Olavinlinna Castle and Häme Castle.

The National Board of Antiquities is responsible for protecting environments with cultural history value, archaeological culture heritage and architectural heritage, and other cultural property.
Suomi-laiva ja lapset_MV kuvakokoelmat_SUK530 1848

Media images

Viipurin asukas 1944_Ruponen_Kuvakokoelmat


Perezin perhe 1973_Matti Tapola_JOKA Museovirasto


turvapaikanhakijat joulupukki_Kaisa Rautaheimo HS


Media images



For the media on 15 October 2015

Sibelius. One must live every note

Exhibition at the National Museum of Finland

16 October 2015 - 13 March 2016


The music of composer Jean Sibelius (1865‒1957) and the original musical manuscripts exhibited for the first time open a window on the Sibelius era. The original materials exhibited include the Lemminkäinen Suite, the Violin Concerto and Symphony No. 5, which are at the core of Sibelius’ oeuvre.
The opening of the exhibition will have a premiere of a draft composition that Sibelius wrote in 1902. Sibelius’ international importance is reflected in Andy Warhol’s (1928‒1987) drawing of him, exhibited in Finland for the first time.
The exhibition is connected to the 150th anniversary of Jean Sibelius’ birth and executed as a joint effort between the National Museum, National Library, National Archives and Ainola. The exhibition features public events and parts of it are also available online as a mobile application at
http://sibelius.kansallismuseo.fi/en

The exhibition is divided into eight sections, whose common denominator is the life of composer Jean Sibelius seen through his music and compositions. There are almost 130 exhibits, including original music manuscripts, sheet music and concert programmes from the National Library as well as letters and bills of exchange from the National Archives. Also on display are suits and dresses that belonged to Jean and Aino Sibelius from the National Museum and artefacts from Ainola. A violin that belonged to Sibelius will also be on display when not in active use in concerts.

The exhibition opens a multi-faceted view into the world’s most extensive collection of Sibelius’ music manuscripts, which is conserved by the National Library. The works included in the exhibition represent several decades and different composition types, such as chamber music, symphonic poem, symphony and concerto, as well as vocal, piano, choral and theatre music. The exhibits include pages from the following works: Korppoo trio, En Saga, Lemminkäinen, the Jäger March, Symphonies No. 5 and 7, the Violin Concerto, the Tempest and Masonic Ritual Music. Late drafts that may be connected to Symphony No. 8 are also among the exhibits.

The National Library’s Sibelius Collection includes music manuscripts and printed sheet music. Most of the music manuscripts were received from Ainola as donations from the family in 1982. The collection has also been increased through purchases and includes some works in safekeeping. The manuscript collection features approximately 2,000 items ranging from small draft notes to entire symphony scores and theatrical works from the 1880s to 1957, the year of Sibelius’ death.

The Finnish Literature Society has published a trilingual exhibition publication that is available at the National Museum Shop.

The composer and music manuscripts

For Sibelius, composing meant letting his imagination roam free and also translating nature experiences, atmospheres, scents, colours and artistic impetus into music. Sometimes it was hard work – “forging” or piecing together mysterious mosaics. The masterpieces were often completed after lengthy struggles, many trials and also errors.

Thousands of pages of music manuscripts, which Sibelius luckily kept and which his heirs donated to the National Library for researchers and musicians to enjoy, are the most important and abundant source for those who study the composer’s creative work; their huge number alone speaks volumes about the nature of Sibelius’ work. A wide-scale publication project that started at the National Library in 1996, a critical edition of the complete works of Jean Sibelius, Jean Sibelius Works (JSW), offers a wealth of new information for Sibelius research.

The opening of the exhibition will bring to light a draft composition that Sibelius wrote in Tvärminne, Hankoniemi, in September 1902. The draft was created around the same time as what is now the most played violin concerto in the world, but it did not end up in any known composition. The draft page was left in the piles of sheet music in Ainola and finally ended up in the National Library’s Sibelius Collection. The composition will have its premiere, performed by pianist Folke Gräsbeck, at the opening of the exhibition on Thursday, 15 October 2015 at 6 pm.

Exhibition publication One must live every note

Published by the Finnish Literature Society, the exhibition publication One must live every note presents the latest information from Sibelius research. The writers include Professor Emeritus Fabian Dahlström, Professor Veijo Murtomäki, Professor Leif Segerstam, Unit Director Marja Pohjola and Senior Inspector Taina Tammenmaa from the National Archives, Chief Intendant Jouni Kuurne from the National Museum, Executive Director Hilkka Helminen from Ainola, and editors of Jean Sibelius Works: researchers Kari Kilpeläinen, title of docent, Anna Pulkkis, Mus. Doc., Tuija Wicklund, Mus. Doc., Timo Virtanen, title of docent, and Sakari Ylivuori, Mus. Doc., from the National Library.

The exhibition is open at the National Museum from Friday, 16 October 2015 to Sunday, 13 March 2016.

Media images
Public events


Preliminary information on the exhibition:

- Curator Aino-Maija Kaila tel. +358 295 33 6362, aino-maija.kaila@kansallismuseo.fi
- Keeper Jouni Kuurne tel. +358 295 33 6381, jouni.kuurne@kansallismuseo.fi
- Curator Outi Flander tel. +358 295 33 6383, outi.flander@kansallismuseo.fi
- Events: Leading Museum Educator Hanna Forssell, tel. +358 295 33 6475, hanna.forssell@kansallismuseo.fi

The National Museum of Finland, Mannerheimintie 34, Helsinki.
Open Tue-Sun 11 am - 6 pm.
www.kansallismuseo.fi

The National Museum of Finland is the historic central museum of Finland with the core mission of archiving and sharing the nationally key capital of cultural history.
The museum family of the National Museum of Finland includes nine museums and two castles: the National Museum of Finland, Museum of Cultures (whose operations continue at the National Museum), Maritime Museum of Finland, Seurasaari Open-Air Museum, Tamminiemi, Hvitträsk, Louhisaari Manor, Urajärvi Manor and Alikartano Manor as well as Olavinlinna Castle and Häme Castle.

Media images



Sibelius_1000x1000px


Sibelius - Viulukonsertto


Andy Warhol_Jean Sibelius piirros


Lemminkäinen iso


Jean Sibelius_piirustus Parolan paraati 1876


Näyttelyjulkaisun kansi Jokainen nuotti pitää elää
Exhibition publication 
One must live every note, cover

Sibeliuksen lähettämä postikortti 21.7.1900


KM sibelius Taneli Eskola Ainola 2015

Media images





Media Release 16.9.2015

Brilliant! – jewellery – photograph – sound

Exhibition at the National Museum of Finland,

18 September 2015 - 31 January 2016

Brilliant! exhibition is The Finnish Goldsmith Association’s 110th Jubilee Year Exhibition offering a unique cross-section of Finnish jewellery design and craft at the highest level starting from the 1960s up to today. With photographs and audio material, Brilliant! presents the masterpieces of 27 people selected as Goldsmiths of the Year from the past six decades.

The display cases at the National Museum of Finland have been filled with professional skill, curiosity, precision, perseverance and vision. The raw materials include platinum, gold, silver and gemstones but also less precious materials. On the walls, visitors can delve into the dreamlike underwater world of the photographic artist Susanna Majuri.

All the Goldsmiths of the Year have their unique designs and work methods. The jewellery and objects were created using different methods, such as handwork, drilling, cutting, hammering and casting. Over the decades, the goldsmiths and silversmiths created unique luxury jewellery as well as serial production.

Since 1987, the Goldsmith of the Year has been selected by the Finnish Goldsmith Association. Goldsmiths, silversmiths, jewellery designers and engravers who display significant professional expertise are eligible for nomination. In addition to the previous Goldsmiths of the Year, the Brilliant! exhibition will also feature three finalists for the Goldsmith of the Year 2016. The winner of this year’s competition will be selected by popular vote for the first time.

The exhibition will be open at the National Museum of Finland from 18 September 2015 to 31 January 2016. A 100-page trilingual publication and public events are linked to the exhibition.

The Finnish Goldsmith Association was established in 1905. The association has brought together goldsmiths and silversmiths, protected their interests and improved their professional skills and livelihoods. The goldsmith field evolves as the trade of a craftsman and new technology find each other. 3D technology is already strongly present in the field. The exhibition demonstrates that Finnish goldsmith skills are alive and well.

In connection with the exhibition a group of jewellery designers and goldsmiths have made a donation to The National Museum of Finland’s collection’s. The National Museum of Finland will thank following jewellery designers and goldsmiths: Jukka Ailio/ Kultaseppä Ailio Oy, Eero Hintsanen/ Chao & Eero, Berndt Lindholm, Esko Lindroos, Essi Pullinen, Petri Pulliainen, Kristian Saarikorpi ja Kirsti Doukas/ Saarikorpi Design Oy, Jouni Salo/ A. Tillander Oy.

The exhibition is a collaboration between the National Museum of Finland, the Finnish Goldsmith Association’s and Briljantti ry. Content design and script Briljantti ry, Pekka Kulmala, Anniina Dunder-Berg, Sanna Nuutinen. Photographic art Susanna Majuri, press photos Teemu Töyrylä. Exhibition Architect Camilla Nenonen. Graphic Design Päivi Sohkanen. Sound Design Pietu Arvola.

Exhibition publication manuscript Sari Aro, lay-out Päivi Sohkanen, photographs Susanna Majuri, product photos Teemu Töyrylä. The publication is for sale at the Museum Shop.

In co-operation with: Kalevala Koru Oy, Suomen Kulttuurirahasto, Antti ja Airi Soljan Säätiö, Atelier Torbjörn Tillander, K.A. Rasmussen Oy, Saurum Oy/Lumoava, Taiteen edistämiskeskus, maki.fi

pdf Brilliant! Media Release 16.9.2015 (256 KB)

Press photos


Additional information:
- Curator Aino-Maija Kaila, National Museum tel. +358 295 33 6362, aino-maija.kaila@kansallismuseo.fi
- Pekka Kulmala Briljantti ry, tel. +358 40 505 2773, pekka@kultaseppakulmala.fi
- Sanna Nuutinen Briljantti ry, tel. +358 40 535 2550, sanna.nuutinen@welho.com 
www.brilliant.fi

Susanna Majuri

Photographic artist and Master of Arts Susanna Majuri is inspired by literature, poetry and music. Understanding, imagination, stories and colours play a key role in her work. Images are used to process emotions and tell stories. In a moment of success, the artist is sparked by the work, radiates happiness and is enchanted.
Majuri has had several previous exhibitions and is currently completing doctoral studies at the Academy of Fine Arts of the University of the Arts Helsinki, studying the potential of photographic fiction as a place where emotions meet. Susanna Majuri is a member of the internationally active group of artists called the Helsinki School, and her works can be found in the collections of the Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma, the Finnish Museum of Photography and Espoo Museum of Modern Art EMMA, for example.

Goldsmith of The Year since 1987
Matti Hyvärinen, Karl Laine, Berndt Lindholm, Raimo Nieminen, Markku Mäki, Markku Laulaja, Morris Lindblom, Jukka Ailio, Juha Janger, Alpo Tammi, Pekka Kiviluoto, Toivo Valkama, Kirsti Doukas, Arvi Kämäri, Pekka Piekäinen, Juha Koskela, Jouni Salo, Kristian Saarikorpi, Esko Lindroos, Tiina Arkko, Rauno Tynkkynen, Tony Granholm, Ari-Pekka Rantanen, Pekka Kulmala, Carina Blomqvist, Essi Pullinen, Heikki Hartikainen.

Goldsmith of the Year 2016
For the first time, the public will get a chance to choose the next Goldsmith of the Year for 2016. You can vote for your favourite at the National Museum or on the Brilliant.fi website. The exhibition displays jewellery made by three finalists for Goldsmith of the Year 2016. The creations of Eero Hintsanen, Petri Pulliainen and Ville Redman open a fascinating and surprising view into the future of Finnish jewellery.

Eero Hintsanen
Master goldsmith and Master of Arts Eero Hintsanen moves in the worlds of sculpture and jewellery design. The designer, who is one-half of the Chao & Eero duo, works on new collections but also unique and grand jewellery works that reflect feelings of ancient mysticism. Nature, man and jewellery are the elements that Hintsanen uses to build works that tell Finnish stories with bleak perspectives. Silver is the most important material for Eero Hintsanen, who continues to find a fascinating roughness and incompleteness in it as he works on it.

Petri Pulliainen
Goldsmith Petri Pulliainen, who works at Aito Helsinki, specialises in rings and demands a lot from himself. His work often takes the hardest route. The most rewarding thing about the work is handing a finished, flawless piece to a customer. Pulliainen’s jewellery emanates carefully considered minimalism and masculinity. Petri Pulliainen currently finds titanium-reinforced and acid-resistant stainless steel a particularly interesting material. He dreams of creating luxury items for people who already have everything.

Ville Redman

Goldsmith Ville Redman, who works at Kultaseppä Kulmala, draws inspiration from the world of technology and classic work methods. Redman has been influenced by machine shops, theatre work and goldsmitheries. His works also carry hints of Icelandic mental landscapes and design. When he comes up with something good, he immediately shares the information. Transparency and interaction develop the jewellery field, and Ville Redman strives to lead by example and create a more open culture.

The National Museum of Finland, Mannerheimintie 34, Helsinki.
Open Tue-Sun 11 am - 6 pm, closed Mon.
www.kansallismuseo.fi

The National Museum of Finland is the historic central museum of Finland with the core mission of archiving and sharing the nationally key capital of cultural history.
The museum family of the National Museum of Finland includes nine museums and two castles: the National Museum of Finland, Museum of Cultures (whose operations continue at the National Museum), Maritime Museum of Finland, Seurasaari Open-Air Museum, Tamminiemi, Hvitträsk, Louhisaari Manor, Urajärvi Manor and Alikartano Manor as well as Olavinlinna Castle and Häme Castle.
Brilliant! Susanna Majuri Blackie triptyykki1 2015
Blackie. Photographic artist Susanna Majuri 2015
(Click for bigger version)


Brilliant! Alpo Tammi sormus_Teemu Töyrylä
Ring by goldsmith Alpo Tammi.
Photo: Teemu Töyrylä
(Click for bigger version)

Brilliant Paakuva pysty 01
(From left to right)
Juha Koskela: bracelet, mokumegane technic and silver. Rauno Tynkkynen: ring, platinum and diamonds. Matti Hyvärinen: bracelet, silver and spectrolite. Raimo Nieminen: necklace, jasper, yellow gold, diamonds, jewels and leather. Photo: Teemu Töyrylä.
(Click for bigger version)



To the Media 10 June 2015

Brilliant! Coming to The National Museum

from 18 September 2015 to 31 January 2016
Brilliant! is The Finnish Goldsmith Association’s 110th Jubilee Year Exhibition, featuring jewellery from the 1960s onwards by 30 Goldsmiths of the Year and photograph art by Susanna Majuri.
The cross-disciplinary Brilliant! exhibition offers a unique cross-section of jewellery made by Finnish goldsmiths. At the exhibition, jewellery made by top specialists, photographs by Susanna Majuri and the soundscape engage in dialogue in an interesting way.


Brilliant! displays the design and handicraft skills of nearly 30 distinguished goldsmiths from a period spanning several decades. The exhibition celebrates the 110th Jubilee Year of the Goldsmith Association. The audience will get to elect Goldsmith of the Year 2016. A 100-page trilingual publication and public events are also linked to the exhibition.

Goldsmith of The Year since 1987: Matti Hyvärinen, Karl Laine, Berndt Lindholm, Raimo Nieminen, Markku Mäki, Markku Laulaja, Morris Lindblom, Jukka Ailio, Juha Janger, Alpo Tammi, Pekka Kiviluoto, Toivo Valkama, Kirsti Doukas, Arvi Kämäri, Pekka Piekäinen, Juha Koskela, Jouni Salo, Kristian Saarikorpi, Esko Lindroos, Tiina Arkko, Rauno Tynkkynen, Tony Granholm, Ari-Pekka Rantanen, Pekka Kulmala, Carina Blomqvist, Essi Pullinen, Heikki Hartikainen.

The exhibition will be open from 18 September 2015 till 31 January 2016. There will be plenty of side program and public events linked to the exhibition.

In co-operation: Kalevala Koru Oy, Suomen Kulttuurirahasto, Antti ja Airi Soljan Säätiö, Atelier Torbjörn Tillander, K.A. Rasmussen Oy, Saurum Oy/Lumoava, Taiteen edistämiskeskus, maki.fi

 Preliminary information:
- Curator Anniina Dunder-Berg, Briljantti ry, tel. +358 (0)40 770 4437, anniina@dunder.fi
- Curator Aino-Maija Kaila, National Museum of Finland tel. +358 295 33 6362, aino-maija.kaila@kansallismuseo.fi

The Finnish Goldsmith Association
National Museum Temporary exhibitions

Photographic artist Susanna Majuri's homepage
www.susannamajuri.com

The National Museum of Finland, Mannerheimintie 34, Helsinki.
Open Tue-Sun 11 am - 6 pm, closed Mon. 
Museum also closed 6 Dec, 24-25 Dec 2015 and 1 Jan 2016.

Entry fees: € 10 / 7 euros, free entry under 18 years old.
Ticket Office: tel. +358 295 33 6901, Tue-Sun 11-18.
www.kansallismuseo.fi
facebook.com/Kansallismuseo
Brilliant! Alpo Tammi sormus_Teemu Töyrylä
Ring by goldsmith Alpo Tammi.
Photo: Teemu Töyrylä
(Click for bigger version)
Brilliant! Susanna Majuri_Blackie triptyykki 1
Blackie. Photographic artist Susanna Majuri 2015
(Click for bigger version)
Brilliant Paakuva pysty 01
(From left to right)
Juha Koskela: bracelet, mokumegane technic and silver. Rauno Tynkkynen: ring, platinum and diamonds. Matti Hyvärinen: bracelet, silver and spectrolite. Raimo Nieminen: necklace, jasper, yellow gold, diamonds, jewels and leather. Photo: Teemu Töyrylä.
(Click for bigger version)

Media release 27 November 2014

Finnskogar - Forest Finns
Exhibition at the National Museum of Finland

28 November 2014 - 1 November 2015
The exhibition tells the story of Finns who moved to uninhabited forests regions in Sweden and Norway in the late 1500s and 1600s to practice slash-and-burn farming. They maintained their unique culture and their own language amongst the native population for a long time. Later on, they melded into the main population.

The exhibition is based on items acquired for the National Museum of Finland by Astrid Reponen (M.A.) during a vocabulary collection trip in 1932. The objects have not been exhibited previously.

The exhibition tells the story of the residents of the 'Finn forests' (Finnskogar), the 'forest Finns' (in Swedish: skogsfinnar); why they left and what their life was like in their new home. In addition to the exhibits, visitors to the exhibition get to experience the old Finnish language spoken by the forest Finns, their Finnish-style place names and their beliefs and spiritual traditions.


Forest Finns is a name used for Finnish migrants mostly from the Savonia area who relocated to the middle parts of Sweden and Norway approximately between 1580 and 1640. Originally the Forest Finns were slash-and-burn farmers, and they cleared wide slash-burn fields to their new living areas. They were also accomplished hunters and fishermen and known for their skilful bark and wood crafts.

The material and immaterial cultural heritage of the Forest Finns differed greatly from the lifestyle of the main populations surrounding them. The Forest Finns maintained their own language for long time, and their language remained old-world while the Finnish spoken in Finland evolved. Their spiritual legacy, folk beliefs and poetry were highly original.

Gradually the Forest Finns became field farmers as well as sawmill and industrial workers. In the 17th century, many of them joined Swedish migrants on their crossing of the Atlantic to America, mostly to Delaware.

Gradually the Forest Finns were assimilated into the main Swedish and Norwegian populations and their language died out in the second half of the 20th century. Genealogy has allowed many Swedes and Norwegians to discover their Forest Finn ancestry and the appreciation of the Forest Finns is now growing strongly in both countries. In Norway, the Forest Finns were awarded the status of a national minority at the turn of the millennium.

The early decades of Finnish independence were the heydays of the so-called national sciences, and at the time, folk researchers and linguists also became interested in the Forest Finns. Among them was Astrid Reponen (1905-1940) who, together with a colleague, focused on collecting the vocabulary of the Forest Finns in Värmland and South-East Norway between 1930-1932. 

Commissioned by the National Museum of Finland, Reponen also collected 130 folk artefacts (mainly wood and bark objects), which the museum purchased from her in 1933. These artefacts were catalogued into the National Museum's collections and stored. Before the exhibition to be opened, they have never been on display.

The backbone of the exhibition comprises the artefacts of this so-called Reponen's collection, more than 100 items of which are on display. The exhibition also features photographs of the Forest Finns' lands taken by Finnish researchers during their field studies: they include people, buildings, yards, landscapes and artefacts. The exhibition also includes audio samples, for example of the daily lives of the Forest Finns and the letters they wrote.

The exhibition also includes photographs of Forest Finns by Finnish researchers, audio samples and a soundscape created by the YLE Radio Atelier. Eero Järnefelt's famous painting Under the Yoke (Burning the Brushwood) is on loan from the Ateneum Art Museum. Works by the photographic artist Ritva Kovalainen also lend a foresty atmosphere to the exhibition.

Public events will be held in connection with the exhibition and a Finnish and Swedish-language exhibition publication will be available in the Museum Shop of the National Museum of Finland from January 2015 onwards.

The exhibition script has been written by linguist Paula Andersson of the University of Helsinki, name researcher and Associate Professor Emeritus Tuula Eskeland of the University of Copenhagen, scholar of religion and Adjunct Professor Marja-Liisa Keinänen of Stockholm University and Curator Antti Metsänkylä from the National Museum of Finland.

The soundscape was created by Harri Huhtamäki and Pekka Lappi from the YLE Radio Atelier.
The exhibition architecture is by Jussi Salmivuori and Teemu Nojonen from the Suunnittelutoimisto Amerikka.
Agency Leroy has designed the graphic look of the exhibition.

The exhibition will be open at the National Museum of Finland from 28 November 2014 to Sun 1 November 2015.


Press photos


For more information on the exhibition, please contact: Curator Aino-Maija Kaila, National Museum of Finland tel. +358 295 33 6362, aino-maija.kaila@kansallismuseo.fi
More information on the events:
- Museum Educator Hanna Korhonen, tel. +358 295 33 6464, hanna.korhonen@kansallismuseo.fi
- Leading Museum Educator Hanna Forssell, National Museum of Finland, tel. +358 295 33 6475, hanna.forssell@kansallismuseo.fi

The National Museum of Finland, Mannerheimintie 34, Helsinki.
Open Tue-Sun 11 am - 6 pm, closed Mon. Museum also closed 6.12. and 24.-25.12.2014.
Entry fees 2014: € 8 / € 6, free under 18 years old.
Ticket Office: tel. +358 295 33 6901, Tue-Sun 11-18.
www.kansallismuseo.fi
facebook.com/Kansallismuseo

Finnskogar tunnuskuva rajattu

Finnskogar_Juhoila piha_Helminen 1930_SUK334 28

Finnskogar_tuoli Östmark_SU5161 12a

Finnskogar_Olsson sauna_Reponen 1930_SUK334 70

Finnskogar_lappakannu SU5161 29c

Finnskogar_Raiskin aitta_Reponen 1930_ SUK334 58

Finnskogar_tuohinen suolakopsa_SU5161 96a

Press release 8 December 2014 for the media

New logo for the museums of the National Museum of Finland

Brand reform was launched for the National Museum of Finland in early summer with a starting point of building brand architecture and a more uniform way of communication for the 11 museums. The goal has been to create a more harmonious brand identity for the National Museum of Finland and to convey comprehensive reform and a museum experience where museum services and events play an important role alongside exhibitions. The National Museum of Finland selected Agency Leroy as the brand design partner.  
 
The design briefing requested a preliminary proposal for the brand architecture and the new logo of the National Museum of Finland. It was important to communicate the role of the National Museum of Finland as an actor that archives, distributes and gets people involved in culture and national history. The brand image needed to reflect the reform of the National Museum of Finland and to build upon the strategic goals of the National Museum of Finland and the vision created together. It was also important to be able to generate comprehensive museum experience where the museum's events, conference services, café, restaurant and museum shop play an important role alongside exhibitions.

The brand persona definition has been a joint effort of the team of the National Museum of Finland and Leroy. "Leroy's proposal was strong, reasoned and contained an idea carrying far into the future. The logo is timeless, classic and long-lasting, and it communicates the direction of the National Museum of Finland rather well. This is important also for the museums because the museums will be profiled more in the future. The National Museum of Finland as a brand, on the other hand, communicates that the museums are all national treasures of sorts. Leroy's team has been extremely excited about the whole thing," says Mikael Neuvonen who is in charge of service sales and communications of the National Museum of Finland.

Designer Janne Hänninen of Agency Leroy adds: "The National Museum of Finland is a landmark and a kind of national symbol. Unfortunately, it has been a onetime visit for many, and as a typical field trip destination. The building and the whole museum family, however, have much more to offer. The National Museum of Finland is not just artefacts in glass cabinets, it is an exciting place and we feel very honoured for the part we play in the clarification of the role of the National Museum of Finland. The logo describes the history of the National Museum of Finland as rooms, spaces and places that open new perspectives to the present."

The visualisation of the brand identity of the National Museum of Finland is now in the testing phase. The starting point for the identity and its visual look has been the museum family concept of the 10 museums of the National Museum of Finland. The new logo shared by all the museums will be adopted in connection with the inauguration of the Forest Finns exhibition on 27 November. The graphics of the exhibition also mostly follow the new look.

The identity will become concrete not only in the graphic look of marketing and communications but also, among other things, in the ongoing brand persona and service promise descriptions. The implementation of the new look will progress after the pilot phase. The graphic basic materials of the National Museum of Finland will be renewed and the implementations of the look will be introduced to the museums gradually during 2015.

The National Museum of Finland is the historic central museum of Finland with the core mission of archiving and sharing the nationally key capital of cultural history.

The museum family of the National Museum of Finland includes the National Museum of Finland, Seurasaari Open-Air Museum, Tamminiemi, Hvitträsk, Louhisaari Manor, Museum of Cultures, Maritime Museum of Finland, Urajärvi Manor and Alikartano Manor as well as Häme Castle and Olavinlinna Castle.


Further information:
The National Museum of Finland:
Mikael Neuvonen, Sales services and communications of the National Museum of Finland,
tel. +358 295 33 6342, mikael.neuvonen@kansallismuseo.fi

Agency Leroy: Monika Nars, Managing Director, tel. +358 40 500 1058, monika@agencyleroy.com

The National Museum of Finland, Mannerheimintie 34, Helsinki.
The museum is open from Tuesday to Sunday, 11 am to 6 pm, closed on Mondays.
Entry fee 2014: € 8 / € 6, persons under 18 years of age free of charge.
Ticket sales office tel. +358 295 33 6901, Tue-Sun 11 am-6 pm.
www.kansallismuseo.fi
facebook.com/Kansallismuseo

KM logo vaaka su ru Agency Leroy

National Museum of Finland logo 2014
(Click the image for a bigger version)



Museoperhe logo korjattu

National Museum of Finland museum family logo 2014
(Click the image for a bigger version)